A work currently in progress….

I’m currently compiling a list of fabulously helpful sites I have found online, which will be invaluable to anyone trying to get their treasured book out there. Once it’s complete, I shall blog to announce that it’s been posted, in all of it’s glory. So watch this space! 🙂

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Audio extracts of our books

Something we’ve always been interested in, is having our books as audiobooks. We’re a bit (okay a lot!) low on funds, so I decided to record my own. I have created two audiobook extracts for both The Liverpool Vampire and Admin Is Hell, and I’m waiting to find out the verdict from the land of the internet peoples before I commit myself to creating them for the other eight books, as it takes so long to record them, edit them and then make them into YouTube friendly files. Please give me any feedback, positive or negative, as I’d like to improve on them if I can 🙂

Our webshop is now live!

Webshop screenshot

I have just realised that I’d mentioned previously that I was creating a new webshop where lovely customers would be able to buy one of our paperback books. Well, it’s finally live and ready to go!

I built it using Wix and I have to say that of all of the internet platforms I’ve used to build websites before, it’s the easiest site I’ve used! It’s so user friendly and I picked it up so quickly. I probably don’t use all of its functionality, but I’m really pleased with the website I ended up with!

I’m so proud of Michael; he hasn’t let his brain injury hold him back and he inspires me every single day.

So, take a peek and please let other readers know that we’re there 🙂

http://www.thewebshopofmichaelpugh.com

Thanks,
Jenny x

Crowdfunded book publishing via Inkshares

I may be the last to catch onto this, but I’ve just happened upon a great website called Inkshares. They explain how it works below:

“Our process is simple: authors pitch, readers pre-order, and we publish. Any author can submit a proposal for a book. Once the project goes live, readers support the project by pre-ordering copies of the book. Readers are charged only when books hit their goal. Once the pre-order threshold is hit, we start publishing: we assign authors an editor, a designer, and we handle all aspects of printing, distribution, and marketing once the manuscript is finished.”

Their stats page is pretty interesting; as of 2:48am on Sunday 30th August 2015:

COPIES ORDERED: 57,558
BOOKSTORES: 193
BOOK PROJECTS: 2,650
FUNDED TITLES: 50
AUTHOR ROYALTIES: $115,879

That’s a lot of author royalties! It seems that a lot of Inkshares’ readers come from Facebook, which I was really surprised at. There are loads of projects I’d love to back but especially “Slothlove“: an inspirational sloth photobook: beautiful sloth photos, inspirational stories and interesting sloth facts. A 100-page art-and-photography book 🙂

Take a look at Inkshares’ website for more information 🙂

Who owns your digital afterlife?

I’ve just read a really thought provoking article online called “Who owns your digital afterlife?

When Iranian American author Marsha Mehran died suddenly in 2014, her father had to go through a lengthy fight to get hold of any of his late daughter’s saved files. He said, “I wanted to know if Marsha left any notes, anything about her sickness, or about what was going on in the last year or two,” said Abbas Mehran. “What’s the difference between the notebook my daughter left for me, with all the secrets of life, and the digital account that Google has?”

It really made me think: if something happened to me, how would Michael access the websites I manage, my email accounts, anything that I take care of? Similarly, if I didn’t handle any of Michael’s admin, and he was in charge of his own digital manuscripts, how would I access them if anything happened to him?

If you’re an author or a writer, it may be something to think about; what do you want to be private and what do you want to be public after you die? Apparently, “Some companies, such as Yahoo, destroy everything and reveal nothing after a user dies. Others take a case-by-case approach. Facebook and Google now have online tools that allow users to choose their digital heirs and how much they want preserved or deleted upon death.” Source

I found the below video really helpful and I will now be making steps to ensure that if anything should happen to me, that Michael can access any of my files, sites or email accounts that he’d wish to.

Let me know if you have any thoughts on this. I know that death is a tricky subject, but unfortunately is one that we cannot avoid.

Why Librarians Don’t Want to Buy Your Self-Published Book

An interesting article.

wrapped up in books

When a self-published author contacts someone in the collection development department at my library, we let out a collective groan. Inevitably, our answer to the request to add their book to our collection will feel personal, which is awkward. It will definitely mean more work for us no matter what, and for acquisitions and cataloging staff as well if we do accept the book as a donation or decide to purchase it.

Librarians don’t want to buy your self-published book, but not for the reasons you think. 

I’ve been thinking about self-published books and their place in libraries a lot recently, as my library has been updating our collection development policy and brainstorming ways to streamline how we deal with requests from authors to include their self-published materials in our collection and how our collection development work complements our strategic goal of supporting content creation in our community.

Then, this weekend…

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