Who owns your digital afterlife?

I’ve just read a really thought provoking article online called “Who owns your digital afterlife?

When Iranian American author Marsha Mehran died suddenly in 2014, her father had to go through a lengthy fight to get hold of any of his late daughter’s saved files. He said, “I wanted to know if Marsha left any notes, anything about her sickness, or about what was going on in the last year or two,” said Abbas Mehran. “What’s the difference between the notebook my daughter left for me, with all the secrets of life, and the digital account that Google has?”

It really made me think: if something happened to me, how would Michael access the websites I manage, my email accounts, anything that I take care of? Similarly, if I didn’t handle any of Michael’s admin, and he was in charge of his own digital manuscripts, how would I access them if anything happened to him?

If you’re an author or a writer, it may be something to think about; what do you want to be private and what do you want to be public after you die? Apparently, “Some companies, such as Yahoo, destroy everything and reveal nothing after a user dies. Others take a case-by-case approach. Facebook and Google now have online tools that allow users to choose their digital heirs and how much they want preserved or deleted upon death.” Source

I found the below video really helpful and I will now be making steps to ensure that if anything should happen to me, that Michael can access any of my files, sites or email accounts that he’d wish to.

Let me know if you have any thoughts on this. I know that death is a tricky subject, but unfortunately is one that we cannot avoid.

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Reading 30 Minutes a Week Can Make You Happier and Healthier

I’ve just spotted this interesting article, which I saw shared on Facebook, written by Jessica Stillman.

http://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/30-minutes-a-week-can-make-you-happier-and-healthier.html

She says, “Folks who read at least 30 minutes a week are 20 percent more likely to report greater life satisfaction and 11 percent more likely to feel creative. They’re also 28 percent less likely to suffer from depression and 18 percent more likely to report high self-esteem.”

I think that’s true. I love reading, it really gives me the opportunity to escape the craziness of day-to-day life and peek into the world of other people. I know lots of people like to watch soaps, but I love to read 🙂

Top 100 bestselling books: how many have you read?

With all of this talk recently of Grey: Fifty Shades of Grey as Told by Christian by E. L. James, it got me to thinking, ‘just what books are in the topsellers list?’ After having a nosey around online, I found this list from The Guardian from 2012: “The top 100 bestselling books of all time: how does Fifty Shades of Grey compare?

Having looked through the list, I have to admit that I have read only 13 so I think I need to up my game!

Here’s a Bed That Looks Like a Book

This is fab! 🙂

NewsFeed

Artist Ruth Beale has created “Bookbed”, a bed-sized book that is on display as part of an exhibition produced with Peckham Library in London.

At the adjacent public gallery Peckham Platform, the bright red “cover” topped with a striped mattress and white pages made of duvets is supposed to promote libraries as places where creativity happens.

“Libraries are one of the few meeting points between society and the individual, public and private,” the artist said in a statement. “They represent more than the sum of their parts because they offer us both practical services and the potential for educational and cultural development.”

According to a review of the piece by contemporary art magazine this is tomorrow, “The bed as book is a neat allusion to the pleasures of reading, and symbolic of our relationship to the library books that we borrow, how they leave public spaces and enter our private…

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