Book review: “A Street Cat Named Bob: How One Man and His Cat Found Hope on the Streets” by James Bowen


This is the review I left on Goodreads:

“I have been wanting to read “A Street Cat Named Bob” for a long time, and I can say that I wasn’t disappointed! James is a really likeable guy, and I found myself feeling so bad that he’d had to deal with such hardships. I guess that’s the difference between fiction and non-fiction; with non-fiction you know that these awful things actually happened. The book was really well written and I found that I couldn’t put it down.

I hadn’t realised that there was a follow up book, “The World According to Bob”, and I’m really looking forward to reading that too.”

If you’d like to be friends on Goodreads, my profile is here:

Exploring Derbyshire: Scarthin Books of Cromford

sarahandserendipity

‘It is clear that the books owned the shop rather than the other way aboutIMG_1476. Everywhere they had run wild and taken possession of their habitat, breeding and multiplying, and clearly lacking any strong hand to keep them down.’ – Agatha Christie, The Clocks

Stepping into Scarthin Books is like entering another world, a labyrinth of passages and stairs with books as far as the eye can see, tucked away in every nook and cranny. It is impossible to know where to look, let alone where to start. What makes a bookshop truly special, in my opinion, is its ability to draw you in as you peruse with giddy excitement in search of that one cover that will catch your eye. Engulfed in the delightfully merging scents of the crisp new and musky old book collections you soon retreat to a cosy armchair, completely absorbed in your own little…

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Bookshop Spotlight: Thistle Books Glasgow

A Novel Bookblog

DSC03105 © Megan Hogarth

Drumroll please…

The first entry in our Bookshop Spotlight series is the West End treasure trove that is Thistle Books! Located (hidden) on a small lane just off Otago Street, Thistle Books is owned and run by Robert Dibble and is packed to the rafters with literary delights, an impressive selection of sheet music and a well-stocked history section with a particularly Scottish flavour.

Discovered only recently after a jaunt to the nearby Tchai Ovna, I was charmed by the shop’s cosy atmosphere and excellent variety. It eschews the sort of Black Books-esque disarray and mania that most second-hand bookshops seem to thrive on – indeed, though bursting at the seams, there’s (joy) actual floor space and some semblance of order. Which appeals to strange folk like myself, who consider a Saturday spent hoovering a very satisfying day indeed.

© Megan Hogarth © Megan Hogarth

I had a…

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Good Samaritan app could make life-saving connections

I have just read this article on CBS News’ website which relates to the UK:
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/good-samaritan-app-could-make-life-saving-connections/

Basically it talks about a new app which was designed by Mark White, a doctor with London’s Air Ambulance service who realised that people in medical difficulties could be nearby to someone who could help them, but that those people who could help would never know about the emergency unfolding nearby.

Please let anyone you know who is a doctor, nurse, firefighter or any other healthcare professional about this app, as many more lives could be saved 🙂

Goodreads Giveaways: Don’t Do What You’re Told

Brilliant advice!

CATHERINE RYAN HOWARD

This summer I’m working on revising and updating my self-publishing ‘how to’: Self-Printed: The Sane Person’s Guide to Self-Publishing. Edition #3 is scheduled for release in a few weeks’ time. (I will definitely be taking advantage of KDP’s new pre-ordering function, so stayed tuned for that.) When I did the second edition back in 2012, only one year had passed since the first but still, so much had changed. This time around, the entire landscape has changed, and there’s so many new and exciting opportunities for self-publishers to take advantage of. I’ve completely changed my mind about some of my advice, and believe more than ever in the rest of it. One thing hasn’t changed at all though: I still think self-publishing is something every author should be involved in, whether it’s their main career or a sideline, and I still think that with great power comes great responsibility…

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